You know in the course of my work, I need to read a lot –for background research for the various projects undertaken by the company and here we are talking about projects of mixed nature and  my reading materials are correspondingly, varied.

These last few weeks, I found myself referring to magazines like “Smithsonian” and “National Geographic” amongst others….

We are working towards building a museum and these 2 magazines are very helpful in many ways.

Anyway, I found 2 articles that, personally, articulate what I’ve been trying to say, ineptly, in this blog and forums back when I still bother with them…. that is…..

The first is from “Smithsonian” and taken from the Q & A section – the person interviewed is American Indian author Leslie Marmon Silko :-

Question :- How is storytelling particularly significant to the Laguna Pueblo , your tribe?

Answer :- In many indigenous cultures the oral literatures encompass the whole worldview, the whole identity of the people, the philosophy, the history. And so storytelling at Laguna Pueblo and among a lot of indigenous groups isn’t just some kind of evening entertainment: it’s the whole basis of community.

The second excerpt is from a special China edition of Nat Geo and here we have an article about the Dong people of Southern China – a minority tribe.

“I have heard that you could ask anyone in Dong village for a song and he or she would sing without hesitation. I would hear many; a welcome song about keeping out invaders, melodies about growing old, Dong favorites about feckless lovers……..”

Folks, a big big part of Chinese history and in particular, TCMA histories are handed down in oral forms. From one generation to the next and unbroken for hundreds of years.

So for me to read some smart alecks dismissing these oral transmissions is really vexing; are they part of the chain?

Do they even know about these oral transferences, usually only done within families?

And please, stop rewriting history just because it suits your hypothesis – you don’t have the right to.

How would you feel if I do the same with your family’s history – it’s like stepping all over your ancestors’ grave no?

Okay, now that I got that off my chest, here is the late Alexander FuSheng performing “Iron Wire” in one of his movies – found the clip over at 56.

Enjoy.